Queanbeyan Deadly Runners set for Uluru relay

Queanbeyan Deadly Runners Rosie Whitehead, Julia Smith, Louise Lippitt and Raelene Thornton have all been selected to run laps of the sacred Uluru. Photo: Gemma Varcoe

Queanbeyan Deadly Runners Rosie Whitehead, Julia Smith, Louise Lippitt and Raelene Thornton have all been selected to run laps of the sacred Uluru. Photo: Gemma Varcoe

The Queanbeyan Deadly Runners group have never been the sort to rest on their laurels, rising before 6am three times a week - despite the chill - to pound the pavement together at Town Park.

The display of continued commitment, passion and drive, has led to four of its members being selected to participate in the Indigenous Marathon Project's Uluru leg of the Deadly Fun Run Series on Saturday, July 16.

The four runners travelling to the Northern Territory will be Louise Lippitt, Julia Smith, Raelene Thornton, and Rosie Whitehead.

"We're very honoured and humbled to be selected to go," Julia Smith said.

"Only four community champions are selected annually from 16 indigenous communities to participate."

"And it's a great group, because it's not competitive and everyone supports one another and encourages one another," Rosie Whitehead said.

"Running is a solo sport but we have turned it into a group sport and it's a great, supportive environment."

"It's like a football team, you can't go win it by yourself, it's a team sport," added Raelene Thornton.

"You can't run out there and just wear this singlet, you have to earn it."

The 2016 installment will mark the fifth anniversary of the Deadly Fun Run Series and for Lippitt, Smith, Thornton and Whitehead, the significance of the location to their culture is expected to ease the running-associated pains.

"It's a spiritual feeling to be running around Uluru," Rosie Whitehead said.

"It's such a sacred place and has such special meaning to Aboriginal people."

In 2015, Queanbeyan Deadly Runners Ginibi Robinson, Cara Smith, Annette Christou, Tamsin Porter and coordinator Georgia Gleeson all participated in the relay and run around Uluru, with Robinson coming away with the record five kilometre time for senior women, at 28 minutes and 55 seconds.

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