Tim Overall ticket takes four spots as Queanbeyan-Palerang votes counted

SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGN: Administrator Tim Overall and wife Nichole led the celebrations as the votes rolled in for the group on Saturday night. Photo: Jamila Toderas
SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGN: Administrator Tim Overall and wife Nichole led the celebrations as the votes rolled in for the group on Saturday night. Photo: Jamila Toderas

Former Queanbeyan mayor Tim Overall's ticket is on track to win four of the 11 places on the new Queanbeyan-Palerang council.

As counting continued on Sunday, eight seats on the new council were all but locked up, with the remaining three to be decided on preferences later this week.

NSW council elections were held on Saturday, with the Queanbeyan-Palerang council among them.

Following the forced amalgamation of the two councils in May 2016, it will be the first time democratically elected representatives take a seat for the combined regions.

With eights seats all but elected, there are still about a quarter of the council's votes to be counted as of Sunday.

As of Sunday, Mr Overall's independent team had won enough votes for four seats on the newly formed council.

RETURN TO COUNCIL: Independent candidate Kenrick Winchester looks likely to take his seat back on the new Queanbeyan-Palerang council. Photo: Jamila Toderas

RETURN TO COUNCIL: Independent candidate Kenrick Winchester looks likely to take his seat back on the new Queanbeyan-Palerang council. Photo: Jamila Toderas

That means Mr Overall, Trudy Taylor, Peter Bray and MIchele Biscotti are all on track for a place at the table.

Independent Trevor Hicks' ticket has won a quota, and the former Palerang councillor looks set to be returned.

The Liberal's Mark Schweikert looks to have also won a spot, as has Country Labor's Brian Brown and another independent Kenrick Winchester.

The Greens' ticket is shy of a full quota but there is a chance the party will win a seat, with the highest proportion of a full quota as of Sunday. That would mean Peter Marshall takes a place at the council.

The votes will travel to a regional counting centre on Sunday or Monday for further counting.

Though Mr Overall is now assured of a place on the council, he will have to work to win the support of his elected colleagues should he wish to be mayor again.

Unlike their respective former councils, the mayor of Queanbeyan-Palerang will be chosen by the elected representatives at the first meeting, rather than the public.

Mr Overall has been the state-appointed administrator since the merger, making decisions in place of the community-elected council.

According to the NSW Electoral Commission, 40,665 people were enrolled to vote in the 2017 Queanbeyan-Palerang Regional Council election.

As of Sunday, nearly 30,000 votes had been counted.

The full results should be known by this week.