Deputy Premier John Barilaro commits to bring greyhounds to Queanbeyan

ACT Greyhound Racing Club chairman Alan Tutt has welcomed news local trainers will have a home in Queanbeyan if the ACT ban goes ahead. Photo: Dion Georgopoulos
ACT Greyhound Racing Club chairman Alan Tutt has welcomed news local trainers will have a home in Queanbeyan if the ACT ban goes ahead. Photo: Dion Georgopoulos

New South Wales deputy premier John Barilaro has reconfirmed his determination to bring greyhound racing back to Queanbeyan as the ACT moves forward with its ban of the sport.

Speaking after announcing a new cross border partnership between the ACT and NSW governments on Friday Mr Barilaro said greyhound racing provided a potential growth area for Queanbeyan.

He said the people of NSW had clearly shown the industry deserved "a second chance" if it could prioritise animal welfare and said Queanbeyan could be at the forefront of an improved industry.

NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro said he's determined to see greyhounds back in Queanbeyan if the Barr government pushes its proposed ban through. Photo: Supplied

NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro said he's determined to see greyhounds back in Queanbeyan if the Barr government pushes its proposed ban through. Photo: Supplied

"A greyhound industry going forward in NSW is one that will have animal welfare front and centre," Mr Barilaro said.

"If there is a track built in Queanbeyan, we can build a track that is designed for animal welfare and I think that could be the first of its kind."

The deputy premier met with representatives from the ACT Greyhound Racing Club on Friday and said the industry needed some certainty moving forward.

ACT Greyhound Racing Club chairman Alan Tutt said he left the meeting with "lifted spirits" after reaching a "handshake agreement" with John Barilaro that offers the club's members some reassurance.

"What we decided to do for the interest of the greyhound trainers in the regional area is get a training facility set up in Queanbeyan as soon as possible," Mr Tutt said.

"The ACT government just wants to stop us doing what we enjoy doing, which is training and exercising animals with the highest level of welfare."

Mr Tutt added the club was still considering legal action and indicated they were prepared to take the matter to the High Court if necessary.

It was reported on Saturday the club had received donations from industry and gambling bodies around the country to help launch a legal battle.

Mr Barilaro said the next step was identifying a parcel of land for a new facility and suggested the old Tralee Raceway or a co-location with the Queanbeyan Race Club who he said supported the move.

He said there would be a gap between the expected implementation of the ACT ban, in June next year, and the time a new track could realistically be built in Queanbeyan.

An injunction sought by the ACT club could help to overcome this time disparity and Mr Tutt and Mr Barilaro said they would discuss further options to mitigate impact on local trainers.