Bush Capital with Brett McNamara | September 5

Not that long ago outdoor play was a normal part of every childhood. We pitched our tents under the stars. We splashed around in a river. We explored the majestic mountains. Nature in all its magnificent glory was our playground. 

CLEVER KIDS: Jemima Lacey, Molly Lacey, Lucy Dolejsi and Joseph Lacey take part in a mapping activity, one of the many creative ways education can be incorporated into outdoor activities.

CLEVER KIDS: Jemima Lacey, Molly Lacey, Lucy Dolejsi and Joseph Lacey take part in a mapping activity, one of the many creative ways education can be incorporated into outdoor activities.

Our childhood experiences shape the values which sustain us on the journey that is life. These natural experiences, nurtured with time, led to an incredibly rewarding career. Nature play as a child can foster this sense of environmental custodianship.

Across the bush capital, children are spending less time outdoors exploring, investigating, immersed in the wonders of nature. With the advent of screen-based technology there has been a generational shift to a sedentary lifestyle.

Nature Play CBR is a brilliant initiative fostering a real sense of environmental connectivity. At its heart the program is about less screen time and more green time.

The philosophy underpinning Nature Play recognises what we instinctively appreciate. It is rediscovering what previous generations understood: we are not separate from nature, but a part of it.

Outdoor Classroom Day is a global campaign to celebrate and inspire outdoor learning.

This Thursday, September 7, join Nature Play and thousands of schools around Australia by playing and learning in the great outdoors.

Anyone who has witnessed the impact that learning and playing outdoors has on children knows how powerful such experiences can be. Learning outdoors creates lasting memories, builds greater environmental awareness, encourages independent thinking and importantly, allows children to feel challenged, excited by the prospects of gaining knowledge.

Nature Play is calling on teachers, parents and anyone who cares about our future generations to get involved in this fantastic campaign.

If you’re a teacher, educator or involved with local schools and new to outdoor learning, why not use Outdoor Classroom Day to try it out? Alternatively, if you’re already involved in outdoor learning, use the day to celebrate what you do and inspire others to join the cause.

If you’re a parent, why not talk to your child’s school about the importance of outdoor learning and play? Ask them how they will get involved and offer a helping hand on the day if they need extra support.

See lesson plans, posters, heaps of hints and insightful inspiration at www.outdoorclassroomday.com.au. It has everything you need to celebrate an amazing Outdoor Classroom Day in our beautiful bush capital.

  • Brett McNamara is with ACT Parks & Conservation Service.​

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