Queanbeyan welcomes newest police officer

 Probationary Constable Daniel Harrison began his induction into the NSW Police Force last week in Queanbeyan. Photo: Elliot Williams
Probationary Constable Daniel Harrison began his induction into the NSW Police Force last week in Queanbeyan. Photo: Elliot Williams

Plenty of us would love to get out from being stuck behind a desk at work, well Queanbeyan’s newest probationary constable Daniel Harrison has done just that.

The former accounting student decided that path was not for him and applied to join the NSW Police Force, fulfilling a long-held dream.

“Obviously I really want to help people,” Constable Harrison said.

“But I also really love the idea of doing something different every day, not just sitting at a desk.”

Daniel Harrison will be the last probationary constable to begin their career at the current Queanbeyan police station. Photo: Elliot Williams

Daniel Harrison will be the last probationary constable to begin their career at the current Queanbeyan police station. Photo: Elliot Williams

Constable Harrison, from Canberra, began his year-long probation with Queanbeyan police last week after graduating recently from the police academy in Goulburn.

He will be the last probationary constable to start their careers at the current Queanbeyan police station before it is demolished to make way for the new station in the next few months.

Sergeant Paul Batista oversaw Constable Harrison’s induction, which included everything from paperwork to driving a police car for the first time and conducting point duty at an intersection.

Sergeant Batista likened the process to an apprenticeship where young officers get “on the job training”.

“He can pick up all the necessary skills and knowledge working in real policing situations with senior officers,” Sergeant Batista said.

Constable Harrison said despite recently graduating from the academy he expected a steep learning curve on the job.

“I think I’ll be learning a lot of new things really quickly,” he said.

“There’s always going to be the bad parts of this job, but you just need to surround yourself with good people,” he said.

Sergeant Batista said watching bystanders rush to help a complete stranger in need after an incident was something he appreciated about the job.

“It’s the best job in the world, I wouldn’t change any of it,” Sergeant Batista said.

“After 31 years I think I’ve seen and heard it all, but you still get surprised.”

He said the force had changed substantially since he completed his own probation in 1988 at Randwick.

He said while the feelings of apprehension would no doubt be similar, the equipment, vehicles, training and focus on mental health and wellbeing had all progressed.